Family Law AssociationThe Law Society of Scotland
Glasgow 0141 375 1222

Jones Whyte Law Blog & News

The latest legal news, blogs and announcements from Jones Whyte Law.
Holly O'Hara

Divorce in Scotland: An Overview To Getting A Divorce

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When you get married or enter into a civil partnership, you acquire a status that creates rights and obligations between you and your spouse/partner. The main consequences of this status include occupancy rights, succession rights and the obligation to aliment.However, when a marriage or civil partnership breaks down, spouses/partners have the possibility of legally ending the marriage/partnership and these rights and obligations by seeking a Divorce or Dissolution. This article will set out the Divorce procedures in Scotland. If you would like information on the Dissolution of Civil Partnerships, contact one of our Family Law Solicitors today on 041 375 1222.

Jones Whyte Law

How Divorce Will Affect Your Will

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Couples, during marriage, tend to make a will leaving their assets to their spouse upon death. Once divorced, those couples fail to consider how their assets will be divided upon death.

Alison Nicol

Separation – Is Anyone Listening To Me?

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In a separation involving children, the parties must decide what arrangements should be put in place for any children of the relationship. They must decide where the child should live and how much time they should spend with either parent. Many people are able to come to a mutual decision on this and decide jointly what they believe is in the best interests of their child. There are, however, occasions where the parents, cannot agree on the arrangements and the Court has to become involved. The paramount consideration for the Sheriff in these cases is what is in the child’s best interests. But to what extent does the child get to have a say?

Holly O'Hara

Occupancy Rights: My Other Half Owns Our Home – Can They Really Make Me Leave?

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In the majority of cases, the most important asset that couples will acquire together is a property. The property in which a couple live is often referred to as the family or matrimonial home. Usually, the matrimonial home is owned by the couple or by one of them. Where the home is owned by only one of the parties, difficulties in relation to occupation of the property can sometimes arise when the relationship breaks down.

Jones Whyte Law

The Legal Documentation Required For A House Extension In Scotland

Documentation

When faced with the need for a change of or increase in space, many homeowners will decide to extend or adapt the existing layout of their property, often increasing its kerb appeal and market value in the process.

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